President Donald Trump’s nomination of former Georgia governor Sonny Perdue for Secretary of Agriculture received hopeful praise this past month from groups across the country such as the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the American Farm Bureau Federation and other state bureaus.

“We are strongly encouraged by the nomination of Perdue, who understands the challenges and issues faced by farm families, having grown up on a farm and worked as a veterinarian,” said Pennsylvania Farm Bureau President Rick Ebert. (Read more about Ebert’s thoughts on Perdue and the new Trump administration on page 22.)

“Perdue has the reputation of working on issues of vital interest to farm families, including promoting economic opportunities, such as increasing trade of American farm products overseas; recognizing the special needs and concerns of farmers in relation to immigration reform policies; and understanding the impact that burdensome regulations can place on farmers,” Ebert said.

Perdue is expected to ease environmental regulations as well as directly impact a new policy direction concerning immigration, labor and trade. Aside from having a deep farming background and experienced political portfolio, read more interesting facts about Perdue at right.

We want to thank the readers who took the time to visit our booth at the New York Farm Show in Syracuse last month. It’s a pleasure talking with readers and learning how agriculture is progressing in the Northeast. Thanks for the conversation!

Cheers!

He’s a veteran

Perdue served in the U.S. Air Force (1971-1974) rising to the rank of captain.

He’s broken the mold

Upon confirmation, Perdue will be the second Secretary of Agriculture from the South in 24 years. As a two-term governor, he was the first Republican governor since the Reconstruction Era (1865-1877).

He has family in Congress

Perdue is the cousin of U.S. Sen. David Perdue (R-GA). David, the former Dollar General CEO, along with Sonny founded the Atlanta global trading firm, Perdue Partners.

He was on the big screen

In 2006, Perdue was in the movie “We Are Marshall” where he played an East Carolina football coach whose team played Marshall just hours before the 1970 plane crash that claimed the lives of 75 football players, coaches, staff and other team supporters.

He’s a foster parent

Perdue and his wife, Mary, have four children and are also foster parents. In 1998, they served as foster parents for eight newborns awaiting adoption through Covenant Care in Macon, Georgia.